Garden Notes

Garden Update 4.12.18

Small update, have reached germination of about 50% on seeds planted at seed swap. Certainly achieved faster using an actual starter mix.

The most recent flower starts were in a 50/50 pittmoss and regular soil mix. Will compare those results as well.

Earlier starts have reached almost complete germination, so I feel good about the odds of these more recent ones, especially with better soil conditions.

Weather is looking up in the forecast, hoping for some direct seed planting soon!

Garden Notes

post seed swap

Seed swap had small turn out, and was mostly planting our own seeds and talking about it while drinking beers. So … successful.

Planted some flower starts there, along with a few more herbs. Doing more flowers today, some of which are to be shared with Bobby. I had a helper too! Having never done flower starts, curious to see how timing works out, and if better than direct planting in a few weeks when less frost danger.

 

Garden Notes

Garden Update 3.21.18

About 3/4 germination of tomatoes and pepper planted a few weeks ago. Hopefully the last couple stragglers come through.

There is a seed swap tomorrow night, so I am sure a few more things will get planted then.

Just waiting for temps to warm up so we can get stuff out in the garden! It snowed almost 6 inches yesterday as it is.

Garden Notes

March Updates

Clear sunny day with high of 45. Low last night was upper 20s.

Removed three more of the obnoxiously large grasses from the front yard and moved elsewhere.

Placed last of 14 3×3 beds, which is for asparagus. Hand dug up the year old crowns and spaced further apart in bed. Still need to add good organic mulch on that.

The garlic is also going strong, 15 shoots when counting today. Having completely forgotten to write down how many cloves were planted, no idea of germination rate. The evergreen note to self: take better notes.

Hard to see, but there are garlic shoots in there!

Garden Notes

2018 seed starting edition

Beginning of March is the beginning of seed starting!

Planted several varieties of peppers for both myself and Bobby to share. Maybe a few left overs, but trying to do better about not starting TOO many and then forcing them all into the garden.

Also started a handful of herbs.

Backing up a step, also worth explaining I’ve expanded seed starting to a new set of wire shelves, Two LED grow lights, and two flexible heat mats. Still have to figure out some timing things with lights and mats, but hoping for strong starts, especially with heat lovers like tomatoes and peppers.

Our neighbor thought we had decorated for easter with the pink lights…

Garden Notes

February Updates

Raised bed reorganization has begun. The beds last year were a smattering of different sizes and spacing, along with the colossale structure of a greenhouse/coldhouse at the back.

While I don’t want the most rigid garden in the world, a bit more structure could certainly bring some order to what was a bit chaotic last year. So the beds are getting reconstructed and added to, creating 15 three foot by three foot squares in the end. With about 20″ walk ways between them, a fairly nice grid should be visible when done. The windows from the cold house will be reused to make individual cold frames, and since each bed is identical in interior dimensions, will allow placing and moving them as conditions and plants dictate. Hopefully future me reflects on this as a brilliant and successful endeavor.

The standardized size has also moved me closer to a more ‘square foot’ type garden. While I’m not about to lay down string in a grid over the soil, I hope a few lessons in planning and organization pay off in a slightly more aesthetic garden. I have no illusions of control over nature’s order, but I would like to be able to faster identify what on earth I planted where.

A few of the 3’x3′ beds.

Garden Notes

End of March

Pittsburgh winters are fickle beasts. More and more often we are stuck with a warm November, recently sliding into December, that sees very little snow contributing to a White Christmas. January typically sees freezing cold, and surprise snow one day will be followed by weather just warm enough to melt the snow, turning it into a gray icy mess.

This year, we skipped a lot of the second part of winter that can wear you down, chilling you to the core with sub zero temperatures. It was cold, it was winter, but we also had a lot of days warmer than 50 degrees before we even got to March. All of this is a long winded way of getting to a hard question for someone eager to get planting in the garden: when to start seeds?

Planning out what goes where, and when.

We are officially in Zone 6 in Pittsburgh, and our last frost date is supposed to range from mid April until mid May, depending on which source you ask. Ever the optimist, or maybe just eager-ist, I go by the earliest date provided and sometimes roll back even further from that.

Past gardens have been successful, but we have a larger yard and a more permanent mindset that is fostering a desire for both more consistent production, as well as a longer season of fresh foods. Having tried some succession planting in the past, I picked up a few books to push this idea even further. I would highly recommend Eliot Coleman’s Four Season Harvest. Full of wonderful ideas, charts and theory behind rotating crops, successive plantings, and crop variety, the goal is to push your garden to a year round bounty. Additionally, his farm is based in Maine, so it provided some practical cold world information that a majority of fair weather gardening blogs and books do not deal with.

In front of southern facing windows, on top of a radiator, we now have seedlings for a whole host of edibles, and a few flowers, some of which were started over 4 weeks ago, at the end of February. There are the regulars: tomatoes, peppers, cabbage, radishes. We are also trying a few new things this year: rhubarb, chard, broccoli and cauliflower, as well as a reach goal of growing artichokes.

As March draws to a close, we are now facing a long stretch of warm weather, with not a single low dropping below freezing. In fact, frost appears to be so remote of a threat, I took it as an opportunity to finish construction on our raised beds and begin sowing a few direct seed outdoor crops. Focusing on cold hardy plants, we now have carrots and beets in one of the root vegetable beds. These beds are the typical mix of compost/soil/peat moss, but also have a bag of sand mixed in to loosen the soil and allow for bigger produce than what our compact earth would otherwise generate.

Our five raised beds and cold house in the background.

Some peas and radishes were also planted, with room left for successive crops to follow in the coming weeks, which was also done with the carrots and beets. A few rows of greens, spinach, arugula and a few lettuces, also went into the coldhouse (more on that another time…). Most of our herbs will likely be bought as existing plants, having had much trouble cultivating from seed in the past. One of the few being tried from seed this year is Cilantro, mainly for allowing better staggering of plantings, so we can have fresh all spring/summer/fall.

Over the next few weeks, as we inch closer to certain frost free territory, more seeds will go into the ground, and the seedlings will work their way outside to harden and eventually transplant. The previous flower beds were lined with plastic, which is now in bad shape, and need to be totally reworked before planting there. Fortunately a lot of flower seedlings want much warmer soils, so we still have weeks to work with there.

Garden Notes

Progenitor

A person or thing from which a person, animal, or plant is descended or originates; an ancestor or parent.

What a great word. And what an important lesson.

Last week I spent a solid evening pouring over old mapsproperty records and deeds. Clearly I wasn’t going to these pages for their looks, so why the allure? All in the search of a beginning.

With any house I have had interest in, one of my first immediate questions is: who built it and why? What was their goal? Often the answers are very underwhelming, but every now and then you can uncover treasures.

In either case, the knowledge gained will give you a greater appreciation of the structure you are working on, and maybe even some perspective on why certain decisions were made. Everything from the progression of infrastructure items like plumbing, electrical and gas, to the layout and subsequent modifications, can then be given a clear lineage once you know where it starts.

If you have the slightest interest in history and buildings, I urge you to find similar resources as above for where you live, and dive deep. Have fun. And slowly build a timeline of what happened in and around the building of interest, yours or otherwise. I guarantee you will walk away with more than just the facts learned, a broader appreciation of stories that have already been written and are awaiting your contribution.