Garden Update 3.23.18 – post seed swap

Seed swap had small turn out, and was mostly planting our own seeds and talking about it while drinking beers. So … successful.

Planted some flower starts there, along with a few more herbs. Doing more flowers today, some of which are to be shared with Bobby. I had a helper too! Having never done flower starts, curious to see how timing works out, and if better than direct planting in a few weeks when less frost danger.

 

Piroshki

For the conclusion of our Russian Winter TV Club’s watching of the BBC’s War & Peace, I decided to make this classic stuffed bread. Haven’t dabbled much with stuffed breads before, so figured start with one with very thin crust surrounding the filling to reduce chances of it being under-baked.

Ingredients:

  • 482g AP Flour
  • 113g sour cream
  • 57g soft unsalted butter
  • 113g warm water
  • 2 large eggs
  • 25g sugar
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons salt
  • 2 teaspoons yeast

Mixed together and kneaded for a few minutes. Set into a bowl and allowed to rise until nearly doubled in size, about an hour. Separated into 18 or so even sizes (bout 40-50g if memory serves…) and rolled them all fairly thin, probably 3-5mm in thickness. I let them relax a bit as I rolled, and probably say another 10-15 min before putting in the filling.

Made two fillings – one with sautéed mushrooms, the other with faux beef crumbles. Each were mixed with a large amount of onions, some garlic, and salt and black pepper. The mushrooms got a cheddar cheese mixed in, the ‘beef’ more of a parm/mozzarella mix. I think each mix ended up being around 200g total…

Egg-washed the rounds before placing the filling in the middle, and then folding over, like a pierogi. Crimped shut and then let them all sit for 30 or so minutes after filling to allow a secondary proof.

Baked at 400 for 20 minutes. Rotated sheets top to bottom and flipped front to back halfway through. They were quite delicious!

Breadtry 3.8.18

A different dough, but dough all the same.

2 1/4 cups 50/50 blend of AP and Bread flour

1/2 tsp. salt

1/2 tsp. instant yeast

3 Tbs. olive oil

3/4 cup luke warm water

Mix together the dry ingredients and then add water. Slowly add olive oil after dough comes together, and continue kneading for 4-5 minutes, until silky smooth.

In this case, let it rest in the fridge for almost 9 hours, removed and let come up to temp for an hour and a half before rolling out. This makes two 6 slice pizzas, we covered one with a garlic sauce and mozzarella and Parmesan with mushrooms for a white pizza. The other was some pizza sauce from scratch with mozzarella, tomatoes and spinach.

Since I don’t own a peel, improvised with the back of a baking sheet. Used cast iron griddle instead of baking stone, seemed to work alright. Oven was preheated to 500 F with cast iron already inside.

Delicious!

Breadtry 3.2.18

Another round of french bread. Baguettes again? Maybe a more fun shape.

Starting with pâté fermentée as follows:

142g bread

142g AP

5.5g salt

1.5 SAF instant yeast

184g yeast

Kneaded for 5 minutes after coming together in bowl. Back into a probably overly oiled boil for 18-24 hours.

Returned 20 hours later and added the remainder ingredients (which is just the same as the fermentée a second time over…). Paid careful attention to proof times, and gave extra care to transfers following secondary ferment.

Decided to use this batch as an opportunity to practice some scissor scoring methods, attempting an Épi and some spiky boules. I didn’t cut at quite the right angle, or far enough into the loaf on the former. The latter could have used deeper cuts, but I was worried about degassing. Maybe change angle for a larger slice but with less puncture into the loaf?

Garden update 3.2.18

Clear sunny day with high of 45. Low last night was upper 20s.

Removed three more of the obnoxiously large grasses from the front yard and moved elsewhere.

Placed last of 14 3×3 beds, which is for asparagus. Hand dug up the year old crowns and spaced further apart in bed. Still need to add good organic mulch on that.

The garlic is also going strong, 15 shoots when counting today. Having completely forgotten to write down how many cloves were planted, no idea of germination rate. The evergreen note to self: take better notes.

Hard to see, but there are garlic shoots in there!

Garden Update 3.1.18, seed starting edition

Beginning of March is the beginning of seed starting!

Planted several varieties of peppers for both myself and Bobby to share. Maybe a few left overs, but trying to do better about not starting TOO many and then forcing them all into the garden.

Also started a handful of herbs.

Backing up a step, also worth explaining I’ve expanded seed starting to a new set of wire shelves, Two LED grow lights, and two flexible heat mats. Still have to figure out some timing things with lights and mats, but hoping for strong starts, especially with heat lovers like tomatoes and peppers.

Our neighbor thought we had decorated for easter with the pink lights…

Garden Update 2.16.18

Raised bed reorganization has begun. The beds last year were a smattering of different sizes and spacing, along with the colossale structure of a greenhouse/coldhouse at the back.

While I don’t want the most rigid garden in the world, a bit more structure could certainly bring some order to what was a bit chaotic last year. So the beds are getting reconstructed and added to, creating 15 three foot by three foot squares in the end. With about 20″ walk ways between them, a fairly nice grid should be visible when done. The windows from the cold house will be reused to make individual cold frames, and since each bed is identical in interior dimensions, will allow placing and moving them as conditions and plants dictate. Hopefully future me reflects on this as a brilliant and successful endeavor.

The standardized size has also moved me closer to a more ‘square foot’ type garden. While I’m not about to lay down string in a grid over the soil, I hope a few lessons in planning and organization pay off in a slightly more aesthetic garden. I have no illusions of control over nature’s order, but I would like to be able to faster identify what on earth I planted where.

A few of the 3’x3′ beds.

Breadtry 1.23.17

Trying out longer autolyse periods to increase strength for a better shaped boule, while still being light enough for open airy crumb.

125g AP Flour
130g Bread Flour
125g water

Let sit for 2 hours, then added to start fermentation:

1/2 tsp SAF yeast
1/2 tsp barley malt syrup
125g bread flour
60g water
1/2 tsp salt

Tuck and fold four times at ten minute increments. Then allow for a one hour proof before transferring to sheet. Allow 30 minutes rest and preheat oven to 475, then bake for 30 minutes.

Results were tightly formed boules that held their vertical shape much better than past attempts. Not as open of a crumb as desired, probably not enough hydration (could probably increase in first autolyse step)

Garden Notes: End of March

Pittsburgh winters are fickle beasts. More and more often we are stuck with a warm November, recently sliding into December, that sees very little snow contributing to a White Christmas. January typically sees freezing cold, and surprise snow one day will be followed by weather just warm enough to melt the snow, turning it into a gray icy mess.

This year, we skipped a lot of the second part of winter that can wear you down, chilling you to the core with sub zero temperatures. It was cold, it was winter, but we also had a lot of days warmer than 50 degrees before we even got to March. All of this is a long winded way of getting to a hard question for someone eager to get planting in the garden: when to start seeds?

Planning out what goes where, and when.

We are officially in Zone 6 in Pittsburgh, and our last frost date is supposed to range from mid April until mid May, depending on which source you ask. Ever the optimist, or maybe just eager-ist, I go by the earliest date provided and sometimes roll back even further from that.

Past gardens have been successful, but we have a larger yard and a more permanent mindset that is fostering a desire for both more consistent production, as well as a longer season of fresh foods. Having tried some succession planting in the past, I picked up a few books to push this idea even further. I would highly recommend Eliot Coleman’s Four Season Harvest. Full of wonderful ideas, charts and theory behind rotating crops, successive plantings, and crop variety, the goal is to push your garden to a year round bounty. Additionally, his farm is based in Maine, so it provided some practical cold world information that a majority of fair weather gardening blogs and books do not deal with.

In front of southern facing windows, on top of a radiator, we now have seedlings for a whole host of edibles, and a few flowers, some of which were started over 4 weeks ago, at the end of February. There are the regulars: tomatoes, peppers, cabbage, radishes. We are also trying a few new things this year: rhubarb, chard, broccoli and cauliflower, as well as a reach goal of growing artichokes.

As March draws to a close, we are now facing a long stretch of warm weather, with not a single low dropping below freezing. In fact, frost appears to be so remote of a threat, I took it as an opportunity to finish construction on our raised beds and begin sowing a few direct seed outdoor crops. Focusing on cold hardy plants, we now have carrots and beets in one of the root vegetable beds. These beds are the typical mix of compost/soil/peat moss, but also have a bag of sand mixed in to loosen the soil and allow for bigger produce than what our compact earth would otherwise generate.

Our five raised beds and cold house in the background.

Some peas and radishes were also planted, with room left for successive crops to follow in the coming weeks, which was also done with the carrots and beets. A few rows of greens, spinach, arugula and a few lettuces, also went into the coldhouse (more on that another time…). Most of our herbs will likely be bought as existing plants, having had much trouble cultivating from seed in the past. One of the few being tried from seed this year is Cilantro, mainly for allowing better staggering of plantings, so we can have fresh all spring/summer/fall.

Over the next few weeks, as we inch closer to certain frost free territory, more seeds will go into the ground, and the seedlings will work their way outside to harden and eventually transplant. The previous flower beds were lined with plastic, which is now in bad shape, and need to be totally reworked before planting there. Fortunately a lot of flower seedlings want much warmer soils, so we still have weeks to work with there.